The EEOC’s Analytical Framework Has a Hole

The EEOC has articulated an “analytical framework” for proving cases of intentional discrimination (also known as  disparate treatment discrimination).

Unfortunately, the framework has a crater-sized hole – the Judge.

In a decision that recently was upheld by the EEOC Office of Federal Operations (OFO), an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) dismissed a 2011 age discrimination complaint involving a failure to hire by an agency of the Social Security Administration. There was clear evidence of collusion to cover-up of age discrimination by the hiring officer and his assistant, undisputed proof of interference by SSA attorneys in the investigation of the case by the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer in clear violation of EEOC policy, and the novice, untrained hiring officer admitted that he based his selections  entirely on subjective criteria and completely ignored the complainant’s superior qualifications.  The judges agreed with the SSA that the hiring officer was within his rights to  hire candidates that he deemed a good fit for the SSA’s “culture.” Specifically, the OFO upheld the ALJ’s ruling that reliance on subjective criteria is “appropriate and necessary when the selection, as here, involves the consideration of collegial, professional, teamwork and administrative abilities that do not lend themselves to objective measurement.”

The law and EEOC rules instruct employers to hire candidates based upon neutral and objective job-related criteria so as to avoid subjective decisions based on personal stereotypes or hidden bias.

Considerable research shows that hiring officers suffer from implicit bias and ageist stereotypes – what about judges?

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